The Perks Of Being A Small Blogger

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As a blogger I'm fully aware that I am and possibly will be a small blogger for the foreseeable future but whilst that may have some drawbacks however there are some big positives to never making the big leagues. Everyone's blogging experience is different, some folks have a quick almost meteoric rise into the world of social media whereas as some have a slow burning progression, I'm very much in the second category but here are a few reasons as to why I don't begrudge my blogging career thus far. What does your blogging journey look like? Have you noticed a change in how you do things thanks to your numbers?

Your Voice Is Tiny

I'm well aware that my blog in terms of numbers is a tiny droplet compared to the ocean of other great creatives out there, some of whom have made a brilliant full time career out of it, meaning they have a more powerful reach and voice to be heard, my outreach is incredibly small in comparison but this has many good points to it too. Although it can be deemed a bad thing to not have all the followers, it can also be kind of awesome because you know those who do and interact with you are doing so because they like what you're putting out there. Not to say that's not the case for well established bloggers but you build your own quiet corner for a mini community. It's also a good thing because there are so many attitudes out there, so many opinions, that having the fear of saying the wrong thing can cause you to pour over every word choice you use and like texting sometimes social media can take away sarcasm, humour, tone - all kinds of things which can take the original statement out of context. A lot of bigger bloggers and creatives get a huge amount of backlash for exploring some of the concepts they do (dependent on how it's discussed and what the subject matter is) but as a small blogger you can sort of travel under the radar, learning from others, taking inspiration from those who carry themselves well / explore topics the way they do and your faux pas can be altered or explained without many repercussions. For me, growing my tone and voice as a person and a blogger has taken time (and could do with a bit more) but in all honesty I tend not to discuss anything controversial topics and as a boring old lady what may be relevant to me may not be to someone else.

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You Get To Practice & Play With New Ideas 'Easily'

As I mentioned in the top section it's taken time to develop my own style of writing but also photography, brand image and what I want my blog to offer. Even though I have a degree in photography it still takes experience, an understanding of your brand and a growth in your own personal style to create that look you want to identify with your blog (all of which has yet to be perfected), when you're smaller you can play with ideas that do or don't work and move on without others getting involved although sometimes you may want the feedback to taken into account your audience. New projects, regardless of subject matter, can take a lot out of you especially if it's something unfamiliar or advanced so your plans can be made a little easily when you don't have a big site to manage. Sometimes things work out for the better whilst others don't, for example there are some subjects I don't talk about regularly on here but in the past I put more of a focus on and that's just a small idea that has waned over time. It's just about evolving bits and bobs even the behind the scenes ideas like HTML, correspondence, tone, brand work, confidence and business skills. 

 

You Get To Engage With All Comments

As a smaller blogger you have the time to interact with your audience, comments or emails without it being too overwhelming, with some of my favourite bloggers or youtubers their comments section can go on for days which would be a lovely reality to be faced with but on occasion I'd imagine a few people can be overlooked by accident (or by design) which could leave them feeling less that a 100%. To give everyone a concerned answer takes time, replying, visiting their website and leaving them a comment to - it spreads the blogger love a little bit further but could this process work for someone who get over 200 comments? Let alone someone who gets 1000s? As a teeny tiny blogger you have the time to engage with all the replies you receive across all social media accounts and get involved with twitter chats which is something I've been trying to join when I can but also make connections with new folks. 

You Don't Get Spammed As Much

One of my biggest pet peeves in blogging is receiving generic, impersonal emails about the latest releases that have no correlation to me or my blog (no I'm not interested in the latest lawnmower and it will not be getting free coverage either) from people who have added you to their mailing list without your consent just because your email is on your site. I admit it doesn't happen all the time but it happens and the majority of my email time is spent either unsubscribing from mailing lists or deleting irrelevant pieces that have no links to Not Copper Armour. Imagine this on a much larger scale and you'd want to pull your hair out all the time however it's possible you're also welcoming in more actual brand work too. Like most things it's swings and roundabouts.

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You Get To Practice & Play With New Ideas 'Easily'

As I mentioned in the top section it's taken time to develop my own style of writing but also photography, brand image and what I want my blog to offer. Even though I have a degree in photography it still takes experience, an understanding of your brand and a growth in your own personal style to create that look you want to identify with your blog (all of which has yet to be perfected), when you're smaller you can play with ideas that do or don't work and move on without others getting involved although sometimes you may want the feedback to taken into account your audience. New projects, regardless of subject matter, can take a lot out of you especially if it's something unfamiliar or advanced so your plans can be made a little easily when you don't have a big site to manage. Sometimes things work out for the better whilst others don't, for example there are some subjects I don't talk about regularly on here but in the past I put more of a focus on and that's just a small idea that has waned over time. It's just about evolving bits and bobs even the behind the scenes ideas like HTML, correspondence, tone, brand work, confidence and business skills. 

There Isn't The Outside Pressure

Blogging can be an all consuming project to undertake so depending on how you work or how much pressure you put on yourself it can be overwhelming and affect other aspects of your life. It's possible you're already running a successful blog but also have an outside job role to help support you money wise as well, that can be a lot of stress especially with the added ideas of brand collaboration, agencies and audience expectations. As a creative it's inevitable that you probably put some kind of self-imposed judgement / pressure / level you want to achieve on yourself without the help others so when you have other things to consider it's hard not to feel like you're drowning. Even more so if you feel like you're not getting anywhere with blogging too but when you don't have all the followers you can be a little more relaxed as you don't have that responsibility, you can allow yourself to be a little selfish. That being said a lot of folks are really understanding so if your post is a day late or you make a mini mistake for whatever reason it'll be ok and people who like your content will stick around. Some people don't post for days, weeks even months but they're still worth the wait. 

What are the positives to your blogging situation?

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